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I gave Larry this script and a few days later he asked me to write for him. He had a very loose idea, and wanted to see if I could turn it into a movie. Movies that were based on reality, and an adolescent world, but that were pushed into the hyperreal, or hyperpoetic. Larry and I both liked the idea of using real people, not actors.

I just figured I would write it in a week. I understood the language, how they spoke, and the rhythm of it, the slang and the cadences. That movie was very stream of consciousness. I just let it go.

Living in Harmony - The Harmony Project

But Larry was really into it, and within a couple of weeks I flew out to Los Angeles and started meeting with producers and financiers. That was so exciting. This was the first time I thought that maybe I had a chance to make my films. And all the people in the movie were friends of mine.

None of us had ever done anything.

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So the fact that this movie existed, that we had somehow created it, was a weird, strange, magic moment in time. But it was a hard film. EB Gummo is a mysterious film in many ways. And even then, I try a little more, just to see what happens. EB Your third feature film, Mister Lonely , deals with the dream of reinventing oneself. How did you come up with the idea of a place where impersonators would gather and create a community of sorts? The singing eggs. I was coming out of a fog. That movie still has traces of that fog. I grew up in a commune, so some of it has to do with that.

I try to think in terms of pure story, characters, and camera. I never have any type of conscious psychology at work. I feel something and then I act on it, mostly. HK I had a dream about nuns jumping out of airplanes without parachutes. I thought it was a funny premise, and I liked the visual component, the idea of seeing these dead celebrities together in one place.

It was intriguing. And also this idea of characters living on the fringes of society, creating their own utopia.

Transcendent Order

Extreme wealth and extreme poverty are smacking up against each other, both sides influencing each other, everything blurring under a pink sky. I ride my bike around the boardwalk, drink Cuban coffee, smoke cigars. The palm trees, the sky, the boats, the architecture, all of that is appealing to me. HK I had a vision of girls in ski masks and bikinis robbing tourists on the beach.

I wrote a script very quickly, just a skeleton, with thirty lines of dialogue. I wanted to make a film that was like electronic music using samples, I wanted a repetition to it. The same way DJs can loop music, I can loop sequences. The narrative would explode and become more liquid, almost like a video game. So I began collecting spring-break imagery: pictures of pool parties, coed pornography, kids in cheap motels puking in the hallways, violence. There was something interesting in those images, it was a world in itself. Spring break is a rite of passage.

I was also interested in the way it looks: the colors, bikinis, shadows from palm trees, trailer homes, resorts, beaches. How things look under neon at night, the harshness and strangeness of the lightning, the presence of water. It started to speak to me like a weird pop poem. EB Were you happy with the reaction you got for Spring Breakers? HK Yes. With my other films, they often made a substantial impact on youth culture, but it takes a long time. It was nice with Spring Breakers that the reaction was more immediate.

HK Of course. But so many people were just vicious, coming after me in a personal way. HK The films are meant to provoke. I have something very specific that I want to see and I have a short amount of time to do it. Life is so fast, I just want to enjoy it, to make things that are beautiful, to make mistakes and entertain. Art takes place in a slightly more rarefied world. You usually do a show in one space at one time. With movies, you blast them to the world all at once.

I do shorts and videos, but I only make a long film every five or six years. I start to get agitated. If it comes to you, you just put it out there. I had exhibitions early on, when I was younger, but I never really pursued it fully.

Transcendent Order

The films were public, the artwork was more personal. Is it going to be similar to Spring Breakers? HK It will be a continuation of that style but for a totally different world, setting, and story line. I just figured I would write it in a week. I understood the language, how they spoke, and the rhythm of it, the slang and the cadences. That movie was very stream of consciousness. I just let it go. But Larry was really into it, and within a couple of weeks I flew out to Los Angeles and started meeting with producers and financiers.

That was so exciting.

This was the first time I thought that maybe I had a chance to make my films. And all the people in the movie were friends of mine.

The Dynamics of the Symbol

None of us had ever done anything. So the fact that this movie existed, that we had somehow created it, was a weird, strange, magic moment in time. But it was a hard film. EB Gummo is a mysterious film in many ways. And even then, I try a little more, just to see what happens. EB Your third feature film, Mister Lonely , deals with the dream of reinventing oneself. How did you come up with the idea of a place where impersonators would gather and create a community of sorts? The singing eggs.

I was coming out of a fog. That movie still has traces of that fog. I grew up in a commune, so some of it has to do with that. I try to think in terms of pure story, characters, and camera.


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I never have any type of conscious psychology at work. I feel something and then I act on it, mostly. HK I had a dream about nuns jumping out of airplanes without parachutes. I thought it was a funny premise, and I liked the visual component, the idea of seeing these dead celebrities together in one place. It was intriguing. And also this idea of characters living on the fringes of society, creating their own utopia. Extreme wealth and extreme poverty are smacking up against each other, both sides influencing each other, everything blurring under a pink sky. I ride my bike around the boardwalk, drink Cuban coffee, smoke cigars.

The palm trees, the sky, the boats, the architecture, all of that is appealing to me. HK I had a vision of girls in ski masks and bikinis robbing tourists on the beach. I wrote a script very quickly, just a skeleton, with thirty lines of dialogue. I wanted to make a film that was like electronic music using samples, I wanted a repetition to it. The same way DJs can loop music, I can loop sequences. The narrative would explode and become more liquid, almost like a video game. So I began collecting spring-break imagery: pictures of pool parties, coed pornography, kids in cheap motels puking in the hallways, violence.

There was something interesting in those images, it was a world in itself. Spring break is a rite of passage. I was also interested in the way it looks: the colors, bikinis, shadows from palm trees, trailer homes, resorts, beaches. How things look under neon at night, the harshness and strangeness of the lightning, the presence of water.

It started to speak to me like a weird pop poem. EB Were you happy with the reaction you got for Spring Breakers? HK Yes. With my other films, they often made a substantial impact on youth culture, but it takes a long time. It was nice with Spring Breakers that the reaction was more immediate. HK Of course. But so many people were just vicious, coming after me in a personal way. HK The films are meant to provoke. I have something very specific that I want to see and I have a short amount of time to do it. Life is so fast, I just want to enjoy it, to make things that are beautiful, to make mistakes and entertain.

Art takes place in a slightly more rarefied world. You usually do a show in one space at one time. With movies, you blast them to the world all at once. I do shorts and videos, but I only make a long film every five or six years. I start to get agitated. If it comes to you, you just put it out there. I had exhibitions early on, when I was younger, but I never really pursued it fully. The films were public, the artwork was more personal. Is it going to be similar to Spring Breakers?


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HK It will be a continuation of that style but for a totally different world, setting, and story line. It will be like a stoner movie. They made movies, like Up in Smoke , that were just about these two guys living in LA smoking huge joints. They were great. EB Rumor has it that you might adapt for the screen a novel called Tampa.